Georgetown News
Volleyball - Mon, Aug. 11, 2014

Georgetown College volleyball adds two coaches this season. With the departure of assistant Amy Barmore, coach Nick Griffin has hired Tori Verville to be his new varsity assistant. Felicia Pace, a long-time coaching veteran, will also be helping out this season.

"Turnover at the assistant position is something you have to expect at this level and with this quality of a program," Griffin said. "Just in my time, I've had two assistants who are now head coaches and I fully expect to see Amy at the helm of a team in the very near future."

Verville started her college playing career in the Mid-South Conference at University of the Cumberlands. Her sophomore year she transferred to NCAA Division III Thomas More. In three seasons with the Saints, Verville played in 91 matches. The setter led the team in assists her senior season, while was second on the team her sophomore and junior years. Her .416 hitting percentage in 2010 was a team-high. She was second best her junior year at .297. She finished with 2,137 assists for Thomas More and the 2012 Presidents' Athletic Conference Player of the Year.

 

"Tori helped the Saints to PAC regular season titles," Griffin said. "Following graduation she served as student assistant for Thomas More and has been with Northern Kentucky Junior Volleyball since 2011."

 

In 2012, Verville helped her NKJV teams to a Blue Crush 16's and Midwest Classic 15's championships as well as Pioneer Region Bid Tournament runner-up finish and qualification to the national tournament.

Pace has been head coach at Shelby County High School since 2002. The Rockets were 176-125 with eight district titles during her tenure.

"We are excited to welcome Felicia to the program," Griffin said. "She has a lot of experience in coaching and a lot of energy that I really think will be a great addition."

Pace is very familiar with the rigors of being a college athlete. She was a middle-hitter for Hardin Simmons University in Texas.

"It has been a goal of mine to be a college coach, but I wanted it to be the right opportunity," Pace said. "Leaving the tradition I've formed at Shelby County wasn't an easy decision, but the time and fit seemed right. Having the chance to work with such a top-level program and a coach like Nick was something I could not pass up."

 
photo
photo
photo
photo
photo
photo
photo
photo
photo
photo
photo
photo
photo
photo
photo
photo
photo
photo
photo
photo
NAIA

PlayNAIA

Mid-South Conference